Dinner/ Recipes/ Snack

Sate Lilit – Balinese Minced Pork Satays

Introducing Sate Lilit: These bite-sized Balinese morsels are going to change your life. Made with minced pork (or tuna or chicken), these easy Balinese Satays are packed with a mouthwatering Balinese spice paste known as Basa Genap. If you’re ready to head on over to FLAVOUR TOWN, read on!

Sate Lilit - Balinese Minced Port Satays - These bite-sized Balinese morsels are going to change your life. Made with minced pork (or tuna or chicken), these easy Balinese Satays are packed with mouthwatering basa genap.

(In a rush? Click here to jump straight to the recipe!)

If you’re a regular reader of Wandercooks you’ll know we’ve just returned from an edible adventure through Bali. Safe to say we’re still on a foodie high after those 12 epic days of binging on as much street food as we could handle 😅, so we couldn’t resist sharing another tasty Balinese discovery.

Without further ado, enter Sate Lilit. 👏🏻

Sate Lilit - Balinese Minced Port Satays - These bite-sized Balinese morsels are going to change your life. Made with minced pork (or tuna or chicken), these easy Balinese Satays are packed with mouthwatering basa genap.

 

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If there’s one thing Balinese people understand it’s how to cook a mean satay. 😍

Wander the streets of Bali with a hungry stomach (and your nose in the air), and you’re bound to stumble across tiny street side food stalls (warung) selling tasty morsels like sate babi and sate ayam (pork and chicken satays).

Sometimes lathered in a fragrant blend of herbs and spices and a healthy dose of kecap manis (Indonesian sweet soy sauce), these juicy on the inside + crispy on the outside beauties are grilled over fiery charcoals on a panggangan (Indonesian charcoal grill).

Now, you could say today’s recipe for Sate Lilit is kinda similar(ish) to these other satays, in that it’s also cooked over a panggangan, but… that’s where the similarity ends.

Sate Lilit - Balinese Minced Port Satays - These bite-sized Balinese morsels are going to change your life. Made with minced pork (or tuna or chicken), these easy Balinese Satays are packed with mouthwatering basa genap.

So what’s going on in Sate Lilit then?

Well, instead of thinly sliced strips of meat, Sate Lilit are made with minced meat.

Yep.

At first, we were dumbfounded – how could that possibly work? Wouldn’t they just fall straight off the skewer?

But I tell you, Sate Lilit are like magic.

(And not just because they DO stay on the skewer) 🙌🏻

Sate Lilit - Balinese Minced Port Satays - These bite-sized Balinese morsels are going to change your life. Made with minced pork (or tuna or chicken), these easy Balinese Satays are packed with mouthwatering basa genap.

How to Make Sate Lilit – Indonesian Minced Meat Satays

The secret to everything that’s good about Sate Lilit is all the extra goodies added to the mix. A few spices, some grated coconut, and a dash of sugar are all you need to bring these babies to life at home.

Here’s what you’ll need to gather:

Basa Genap

Basa genap is Bali’s most famous spice blend and it’s super easy to make at home. Made with freshly ground herbs and spices, chilli, lemongrass and garlic, it brings a massive flavour punch to heaps of Bali’s beloved local dishes. It’s traditionally made using an Indonesian mortar and pestle (cobek & ulakan), but also super quick if you prefer to use a food processor instead.

Head on over to last week’s post for Chef Lole’s full Basa Genap recipe >>

Freshly Grated Young Coconut

For the best flavour and moist texture to your Sate Lilit, it’s best to use freshly grated young coconut. It helps bind the mince meat and keep its shape on the skewer. However, if it’s too hard to source, you could substitute with desiccated coconut. The flavour won’t be quite the same, and you’ll have a slightly different texture, but if that’s the tradeoff to be able to make your own Sate Lilit at home we are ALL FOR IT.

Palm Sugar

Palm sugar brings a delicate sweetness to offset the punchy spices going on in the basa genap. It also helps give a slightly golden caramelised texture to the outsides. Grab some from your Asian grocer, the Asian section of your local supermarket, or head online.

Sate Lilit - Balinese Minced Port Satays - These bite-sized Balinese morsels are going to change your life. Made with minced pork (or tuna or chicken), these easy Balinese Satays are packed with mouthwatering basa genap.

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Sate Lilit - Indonesian Minced Meat Satays
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Introducing Sate Lilit: These bite-sized Balinese morsels are going to change your life. Made with minced pork (or tuna or chicken), these easy Balinese Satays are packed with a mouthwatering Balinese spice paste known as Basa Genap. If you're ready to head on over to FLAVOUR TOWN, read on!
Author:
Recipe type: Dinner
Cuisine: Indonesian
Serves: 30+
Ingredients
  • 300 g finely ground minced meat (pork, chicken, tuna, it's up to you!)
  • ½ cup basa genap (read the recipe here)
  • ½ cup grated coconut
  • 2 tbsp palm sugar
  • 1 tsp lime juice
For the skewers
  • bamboo skewers (pre-soaked so they don't burn) or lemongrass stalks
Instructions
  1. Pop your minced meat in a bowl and add the basa genap, grated coconut, palm sugar and a dash of lime juice, then mix until well combined and smooth.
  2. Now take a soaked bamboo skewer or lemongrass stalk in one hand and a small scoop of sate mixture in the other. Shape the mixture around the top of the skewer/lemongrass, then gently twist, squeeze and shape in a downward motion.
  3. Grill over charcoal for around 5-6 minutes, turning frequently so the sates cook evenly.
Notes
If your minced meat is a bit lumpy, we recommend popping it into a food processor and processing until it's nice and smooth prior to mixing in all your other ingredients. This will give you the best texture for your sates and help them stick nicely to the bamboo.

 

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  • Carlos At Spoonabilities
    25/06/2017 at 3:34 am

    Those pork minced satay look so cute and tasty. Is there a difference in cooking time between the Indonesian grill and an electric inside grill? I can imagine that they will heat differently. Thank you

    • Wandercooks
      31/07/2017 at 12:07 pm

      Hey Carlos! I think it really depends on how much you let the charcoal fire up before grilling. Get it up to a nice red heat and they’ll only need a minute or two each side – if that!

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