Recipes/ Side Dish

Yudofu Simple Hot Tofu Recipe

With a subtle blend of Pure Harvest Organic Tamari, dashi stock and mirin, this Yudofu Simple Hot Tofu Recipe  is as nourishing as it is comforting. Wanna learn how to make this classic Japanese recipe at home? Read on!

Yudofu Simple Hot Tofu Recipe - With a subtle blend of Pure Harvest Organic Tamari, dashi stock and mirin, this Japanese Hot Tofu (Yudofu) recipe is as nourishing as it is comforting. | wandercooks.com

(In a rush? Click here to jump straight to the recipe!)

We’ve spent a fair amount of time in Japan on the hunt for deliciously edible adventures and can never  get enough of this beautiful country.

Maybe it’s the warm, friendly people. Maybe it’s the incredible transport system (perhaps not the world’s most amazing anymore, but still lightyears ahead of ours here in Adelaide. 😅)

All I know is it definitely has something to do with all the amazing foodie discoveries to be found. It’s almost like they’re around every corner, just waiting to pounce!

From street-style Crispy Fried Takoyaki to convenience-store Onigiri Rice Balls to bento boxes of all descriptions, there’s so much deliciousness to choose from.

And this little recipe for Yudofu – aka Simple Japanese Hot Tofu, a common hot pot or bento box side dish – is just ONE of our favourites! 🍱

Yudofu Simple Hot Tofu Recipe - With a subtle blend of Pure Harvest Organic Tamari, dashi stock and mirin, this Japanese Hot Tofu (Yudofu) recipe is as nourishing as it is comforting. | wandercooks.com

 

Please note: This is a sponsored blog post celebrating Pure Harvest Organic Tamari but all opinions are our own. There may also be a couple of affiliate links in this post, which means that we may get a few cents if you purchase something through the link. We want to make sure some of our hard-to-find ingredients are reachable at the click of a button. If you have any questions feel free to contact us.

If it’s cold outside, or you just need a bowl of something to warm you up from the inside out, Yudofu is for you!

At its most basic form, Yudofu is simply blocks of tofu simmered in hot water until they’re warm and nourishing.

But the magic really happens when you combine your freshly simmered hot tofu with tasty dipping sauces like we have today.

Once you blend together the umami goodness of tofu with a few classic Japanese ingredients, you’ll wonder how you ever lived without them!

Yudofu Simple Hot Tofu Recipe - With a subtle blend of Pure Harvest Organic Tamari, dashi stock and mirin, this Japanese Hot Tofu (Yudofu) recipe is as nourishing as it is comforting. | wandercooks.com

But when it comes down to it, I think Yudofu is so popular in Japan for a few awesome reasons:

  • It’s super simple to prepare (always yay!)
  • It’s low in calories/carbohydrates (which, we won’t lie, is always a good thing for food addicted bloggers 😅)
  • It’s full of healthy goodness! Tofu is literally packed with protein, vitamins and minerals.

Serve it beside fluffy rice, a simple shredded cabbage slaw, and a nourishing bowl of miso soup and you’ll be feeling happy and healthy in no time!

Yudofu Simple Hot Tofu Recipe - With a subtle blend of Pure Harvest Organic Tamari, dashi stock and mirin, this Japanese Hot Tofu (Yudofu) recipe is as nourishing as it is comforting. | wandercooks.com

What You’ll Need + How To Cook Yudofu

Yudofu is super simple to make, all you need are a handful of simple ingredients and about 5 minutes to prepare it!

First on the list is:

Tofu, Of Course!

This recipe calls for soft/silken tofu but should work fine with firm tofu as well.

For the most beautiful looking Yudofu, make sure to handle your tofu with care. It can fall apart very easily, especially when you’re trying to coax it out of a plastic container.

We recommend draining the liquid first before turning the tofu out into your palm. From here you can slice the tofu into smaller blocks while it’s resting on your palm (but only if you promise to be careful). 😉

Dashi Stock

To keep things quick and simple we’ve used dashi stock powder in this recipe, however you may prefer to make real dashi stock from kombu seaweed and bonito flakes. If so, check out this homemade dashi recipe from Just One Cookbook. Vegetarian? No problem – you’ll want to look for the kombu dashi (seaweed only stock).

Pure Harvest Tamari Sauce

While it’s true that tamari and soy sauce are quite similar in terms of flavour and appearance, there are a couple of key differences between them.

The first is the presence of wheat – or rather, the absence of wheat in tamari, which makes tamari an excellent soy sauce substitute for those with Gluten Free diets.

The second is that while soy sauce is almost ubiquitous in Asian cuisines, tamari is a uniquely Japanese creation. It has a purer, more balanced, less salty flavour, which means it’s also great for dipping your Japanese Gyoza/Potstickers.

And thirdly, it contains more protein than regular soy sauce, which means it’s healthier to boot!

Pure Harvest Tamari is organic, sustainably sourced, and non GMO, which means it’s not only a great choice for flavour, it’s also better for the environment.

So next time you reach for the soy sauce, why not experiment with tamari and see what you like best!

Yudofu Simple Hot Tofu Recipe - With a subtle blend of Pure Harvest Organic Tamari, dashi stock and mirin, this Japanese Hot Tofu (Yudofu) recipe is as nourishing as it is comforting. | wandercooks.com

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Yudofu Simple Hot Tofu Recipe
 
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With a subtle blend of Pure Harvest Organic Tamari, dashi stock and mirin, this Yudofu Simple Hot Tofu Recipe is as nourishing as it is comforting. Wanna learn how to make this classic Japanese recipe at home? Read on!
Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish
Cuisine: Japanese
Ingredients
For the Tofu:
  • 1 block soft tofu (approx 300 g), sliced into 4 pieces
  • 1 sheet yakinori
For the Sauce:
  • 2 tbsp Pure Harvest Tamari
  • 2 tbsp mirin
  • ½ tsp dashi stock dissolved in 2 tbsp water
For the Garnish:
  • 1-2 spring onions, finely sliced
  • 1-2 tbsp katsuoboshi (finely shaved bonito flakes)
Instructions
  1. To start the tofu simmering, line a small saucepan or frypan with a sheet of yakinori seaweed, then top with your tofu pieces. Gently pour enough water to cover the tofu, then fire up your stove and simmer for around 6-8 minutes over a low to medium heat. Be sure not to let your tofu come to the boil or it will crumble apart!
  2. Meanwhile, blend together your tamari, dashi stock dissolved in water, and mirin and give it a good stir.
  3. When the tofu is ready, use a slotted spoon or spatula to carefully transfer the tofu to small serving bowls. (You can discard the yakinori now, too.)
  4. Garnish your tofu with spring onions and katsuoboshi, then spoon over with your blended tamari sauce.
  5. We recommend serving your Simple Hot Tofu as a side dish alongside fluffy white rice and miso soup.
  6. Ittadakimasu!

 

Yudofu Simple Hot Tofu Recipe - With a subtle blend of Pure Harvest Organic Tamari, dashi stock and mirin, this Japanese Hot Tofu (Yudofu) recipe is as nourishing as it is comforting. | wandercooks.com

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  • Maki
    12/05/2017 at 8:29 pm

    I was just trying to find recipe of Sanwin Makin (Semorina Cake) and eventually reached out your site.
    Since I am Japanese/ Burmese, brought up in Yangon many years ago.
    Sanwin Makin is the taste of home for me and enjoyed your article with smile (Now Yangon has changed dramatically in these days but what you experienced is of almost my memory !).
    This simple recipe also caught my attention and found slighly strange for me about using Yakinori.
    Yaki(roasted) Nori(seaweed) is not used for soup of this dish because Yakinori is expected to eat with rice etc.-to enjoy its crispy texture but never be boiled. Instead we use a sheet of Konbu seaweed to make tasty stock as you mentioned.
    For the garnish, Ginger paste/ Yakinori cut into strings would be nice option. Korean pickle (Kimchi-cut into small pieces) dizzled with small amount of sesame oil is one of my favourates.
    The dish is made during winter but not in summer.
    In summer we have a cold version, just take out from plastic container and cut into pieces then garnish with what you like and dizzled with tamari source.

    • Wandercooks
      17/05/2017 at 8:32 am

      Hi Maki, thank you so much for taking the time to write to us. We’re so happy to hear our Semolina Cake brought back good memories for you. Thank you for letting us know about the Yakinori as well – unfortunately for us and a lot of our readers it can be very difficult to source konbu – so we use sheet seaweed. In this instance, it wasn’t for flavour for dashi stock but for avoiding the tofu sticking to the bottom of the pan. 🙂

      That’s a fantastic idea for the kimchi on top with sesame oil – we will be trying this next time we make it – thank you!! It’s winter here at the moment, so we’re enjoying the warm meal but we’ll also try your idea for the summer version when the weather warms up.

      Thanks again for stopping by Maki – happy cooking!

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