Baking/ European/ Recipes/ Snack

Lingue Di Gatto – Italian Butter Cookies

12/05/2020
 

Crispy, super thin and delicately sweet: We dare you to stop at just one. Only four ingredients stand between you and these tasty little morsels of Lingue Di Gatto (Thin Italian Biscuits). Dip them in your coffee or ice-cream!

Large bowl filled with fresh Lingue Di Gatto biscuits.

Why We Love This

This thin biscuits straight out the oven pair perfectly with a cup of coffee, or dished up with ice cream

You can eat them as a light snack on their own, or get creative and turn them into cookie sandwiches with chocolate or jam and cream in the middle.

 

Lingue Di Gatto biscuit being dipped in chocolate.

What is Lingue Di Gatto? 

These golden morsels are thin little Italian biscuits, with a name that translates to tongue of the cat (or even cat languages, if you trusted google translate!). The Italian variety is not usually served with chocolate like their German and Austrian cousins, but we say serve it with chocolate anyway! 

We first learnt these in the Italian countryside, near the city of Bologna. Baked by a chef at a charming little farmhouse homestay. (And where we picked up a sweet little recipe for Strawberry Vanilla Muffins, and another for Ragu.)

What You’ll Need

Just four ingredients stand between you and these cookies – and they’re all staple items – egg whites, flour, icing sugar and butter. If you want to get extra fancy, you can add a teaspoon of vanilla essence.

Leftover egg yolks from this recipe? Try some of these recipes over on The Kitchn.

 Ingredients laid out to make Lingue Di Gatto, also known as Langues de Chat in French.

How to make Lingue Di Gatto:

First step is to preheat your oven to 180˚C / 360˚F. Pop your softened butter into a large mixing bowl and add the icing sugar. Mix, mix, mix with a wooden spoon until creamed.

Creaming the butter and icing sugar in a bowl.

Add in half the egg whites and mix, then half the sifted flour and mix until combined. Repeat for the remaining egg whites, then the remaining flour, until you’ve got a soft, sweet and well mixed dough.

Folding in the egg whites and flour into the Lingue Di Gatto batter.

Now, line a baking tray with baking paper and use a piping bag (or make your own homemade piping bag using baking paper – watch our video where we show you how) to pipe out your dough into 6-7 cm lengths, leaving plenty of space between each for the dough to spread.

Piping the Lingue Di Gatto onto the baking trays.

Bake in the oven for around 5-8 minutes, but keep an eye on them and make sure you pull them out of the oven as soon as the edges turn golden brown. Transfer your Lingue Di Gatto from the baking tray to a cool plate or rack and allow to cool.

Optional: Melt your chocolate into a smooth paste, then dip your cooled Lingue Di Gatto and pop aside to set. Don’t eat them all at once!

Close up pile of Lingue Di Gatto in a bowl.

Cook’s Tips

  • Make sure to space out your biscuit mixture on your baking tray(s) with enough space so they can spread out as they cook.
  • Be quick and take them out of the oven once they start to go brown. Immediately transfer them to a cool tray and off of the hot baking tray so they’ll keep their delicious golden brown colour and crispy texture.
  • If you’re feeling extra naughty, dip them in melted chocolate. Make sure it’s melted and nice and hot so it’s not so thick that it breaks the biscuits when trying to coat.
  • Use a piping bag to pipe them out onto a tray for the best results. If making your own, make sure to reinforce with lots of sticky tape so you don’t have a ‘blow out’ of mixture when applying pressure (like we did…whoops!)
  • Don’t overfill your piping bag – pop in 2-3 scoops of mix at a time.
  • For a softer result, pull them out around 5 minutes. For a crispier result, cook for 8-10 minutes until light brown all over.

FAQs

Where did Lingue Di Gatto originate?

Fun fact, the first recorded instance of Cat Tongue biscuits was actually in Austria from well known chocolate brand, Lindt. Although their version was completely covered in chocolate, the thin wafer style biscuits are now popular across Europe – in particular France and Italy, and Asia including Japan and the Philippines.

What should you serve with Cat Tongue Cookies?

In Italy and France, it’s popular to serve Lingue Di Gatto with espresso coffee and ice-cream. Some people even serve them with salads! You can also turn them into sandwiches with chocolate or cream in the middle.

How long do they last?

They keep for up to a week in a sealed container, although they are known to lose their crunchiness within the first 24 hours. So the quicker you eat them, the better!

Variations & Substitutes

  • The biscuits are slightly bendable when you first remove them from the oven, so you could (if you so desire) bend them into all kinds of shapes because… why not? 
  • For a little extra sweetness, add a teaspoon or two of vanilla essence or maple syrup.
  • Change up the flavour, why not add a teaspoon of matcha green tea!

Italian Butter Cookies (Lingue Di Gatto) - Thin and crispy, these moreish biscuits are perfect with a cup of tea or mid-morning snack. | wandercooks

 

Want to cook more tasty snacks? Try these:

★ Did you make this recipe? Please leave a star rating below!

Pile of crispy, thin Italian biscuits in white bowl.

Lingue Di Gatto - Italian Butter Cookies

Crispy, super thin and delicately sweet: We dare you to stop at just one Lingue Di Gatto (Italian Butter Cookie). Only four ingredients stand between you and these tasty little morsels of Lingue Di Gatto (Thin Italian Biscuits). Dip them in your coffee or ice-cream!
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Course: Snack
Cuisine: Italian
Servings: 30 cookies
Calories: 67kcal
Author: Wandercooks
Cost: $5

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup flour (100g)
  • 1 cup icing sugar (100g)
  • 100 g butter softened
  • 3 egg whites

Optional:

Instructions

  • First step is to preheat your oven to 180˚C / 360˚F. Pop your softened butter into a large mixing bowl and add the icing sugar. Mix, mix, mix with a wooden spoon until creamed.
  • Add in half the egg whites and mix, then half the sifted flour and mix until combined. Repeat for the remaining egg whites, then the remaining flour, until you’ve got a soft, sweet and well mixed dough. (Optional: You can add and mix in your vanilla essence here)
  • Now, line a baking tray with baking paper and use a piping bag (or make your own homemade piping bag using baking paper - watch our video where we show you how) to pipe out your dough into 6-7 cm lengths, leaving plenty of space between each for the dough to spread.
  • Bake in the oven for around 5-8 minutes, but keep an eye on them and make sure you pull them out of the oven as soon as the edges turn golden brown. Transfer your Lingue Di Gatto from the baking tray to a cool plate or rack and allow to cool.
  • Optional: Melt your chocolate into a smooth paste, then dip your cooled Lingue Di Gatto and pop aside to set. Don’t eat them all at once!

Video

Recipe Notes

Cook's Tips
  • Make sure to space out your biscuit mixture on your baking tray(s) with enough space so they can spread out as they cook.
  • Be quick and take them out of the oven once they start to go brown. Immediately transfer them to a cool tray and off of the hot baking tray so they’ll keep their delicious golden brown colour and crispy texture.
  • If you’re feeling extra naughty, dip them in melted chocolate. Make sure it's melted and nice and hot so it's not so thick that it breaks the biscuits when trying to coat.
  • Use a piping bag to pipe them out onto a tray for the best results.
  • For a crispier result, cook a few minutes longer until a light brown all over.
FAQs
  • Where did Lingue Di Gatto originate? Fun fact, the first recorded instance of Cat Tongue biscuits was actually in Austria from well known chocolate brand, Lindt. Although their version was completely covered in chocolate, the thin wafer style biscuits are now popular across Europe - in particular France and Italy, and Asia including Japan and the Philippines.
  • What should you serve with Cat Tongue Cookies? In Italy and France, it's popular to serve Lingue Di Gatto with espresso coffee and ice-cream. Some people even serve them with salads! You can also turn them into sandwiches with chocolate or cream in the middle.
  • How long do they last? They keep for up to a week in a sealed container, although they are known to lose their crunchiness within the first 24 hours. So the quicker you eat them, the better!
Variations & Substitutes
  • The biscuits are slightly bendable when you first remove them from the oven, so you could (if you so desire) bend them into all kinds of shapes because… why not? 
  • For a little extra sweetness, add a teaspoon or two of vanilla essence or maple syrup.
  • Change up the flavour, why not add a teaspoon of matcha green tea!

Nutrition

Calories: 67kcal | Carbohydrates: 8g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 4g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 7mg | Sodium: 29mg | Potassium: 18mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 83IU | Calcium: 2mg | Iron: 1mg
Hey hey – Did you make this recipe?We’d love it if you could give a star rating below ★★★★★ and show us your creations on Instagram! Snap a pic and tag @wandercooks / #Wandercooks

 

Italian Butter Cookies (Lingue Di Gatto) - Thin and crispy, these moreish biscuits are perfect with a cup of tea or mid-morning snack. | wandercooks
Lingue Di Gatto - Italian Butter Cookies

20 Comments

  • Reply
    Nha
    03/12/2016 at 4:47 pm

    Love how simple this recipe is, but mine didn’t turn out crispy at all. In fact, they were chewy :(. Any ideas why?

    • Reply
      Wandercooks
      05/12/2016 at 8:59 am

      Hey Nha, hmmm let’s see. How much dough did you pipe out onto your tray? Perhaps there was too much and they became too thick, and didn’t cook all the way through? Try using a really thin tip on your piping bag and aim for 1 cm thick strips of dough and see how that goes. Good luck, and let us know if you need any more help! 🙂

  • Reply
    Marsha
    27/11/2016 at 1:41 am

    I’m not a baker..but would love to try these,
    what is a cookers pipe ?

    • Reply
      Wandercooks
      28/11/2016 at 12:21 pm

      Hey Marsha, you’re looking for a piping bag like this one ( <- p.s. that's an affiliate link. 🙂 ) They help you form the thin little strip of dough to create the cookies. In a pinch if you don't have a piping bag, you can cut the corner off a clean/unused sandwich bag and use that to squeeze out the dough into shape, although they're not as durable so it might break. But definitely a handy hack to keep in mind if you don't have a piping bag available!

  • Reply
    Jenni
    09/11/2016 at 12:08 pm

    5 stars
    Love these cookies! They are so delicious!! Love the soft yet crunchy texture!

    • Reply
      Wandercooks
      10/11/2016 at 11:36 am

      Totally agree Jenni! Love having these with our tea or coffee while we work. The perfect little snack. 😀

  • Reply
    Platter Talk
    09/11/2016 at 11:24 am

    5 stars
    Those little gems are right up my ally!!! I would like them dipped or plain. ( :

    • Reply
      Wandercooks
      10/11/2016 at 11:38 am

      Awesome to hear! And yep, totally agreed. We did the test dip, and I think tea is currently in the lead for us!

  • Reply
    Michelle @ Vitamin Sunshine
    09/11/2016 at 11:13 am

    5 stars
    Those dipped in chocolate would be amazing! What a great little treat next to a cappuccino 🙂

    • Reply
      Wandercooks
      10/11/2016 at 5:00 pm

      Or IN the cappuccino! 😉

  • Reply
    Heather @Boston Girl Bakes
    09/11/2016 at 3:20 am

    5 stars
    Simplicity in baking sometimes yields just the tastiest results! And I totally would have dunked them in chocolate too 🙂

    • Reply
      Wandercooks
      10/11/2016 at 5:00 pm

      Here here Heather! ????????

  • Reply
    Elizabeth
    08/11/2016 at 7:39 pm

    5 stars
    How beautiful and delicate are these?! And dipped into that chocolate – perfection!!!

    • Reply
      Wandercooks
      10/11/2016 at 4:59 pm

      Delicate’s a great word actually! There’s nothing quite like it’s super thin, crispy, sweet goodness. ESPECIALLY with chocolate!

  • Reply
    Cristie | Little Big H
    08/11/2016 at 1:27 pm

    4 ingredients – bonus! I’m so making these and dipping them into a big bowl of chocolate – yum.

    • Reply
      Wandercooks
      10/11/2016 at 4:57 pm

      Sounds like a very good plan! 😀

  • Reply
    Martin @ The Why Chef
    04/11/2016 at 5:12 pm

    5 stars
    I’m making these! Proper show off food when you have guests round and you serve them up with their coffee! 😀

    • Reply
      Wandercooks
      04/11/2016 at 5:41 pm

      Woo hoo, get dipping Martin. They’re so good with coffee!

  • Reply
    Marisa Franca @ All Our Way
    04/11/2016 at 7:02 am

    Cat’s Tongue — that’s what lingue di gatto means. If nothing else Italian’s have colorful names for their dishes. I’ve never heard of these cookies but there are so many regions and recipes in Italy. I’m definitely making them. Thank you for sharing.

    • Reply
      Wandercooks
      04/11/2016 at 5:39 pm

      You’re welcome Marisa, I can’t wait for you to try them. Let us know how they turn out! 🙂 x

    Leave a Reply

    Recipe Rating




    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.