Recipes

Authentic Hungarian Goulash (Gulyas)

Authentic Hungarian Goulash (Gulyas) is the ULTIMATE comfort food. What’s not to love about slow-simmered beef and potatoes infused with spicy paprika and homemade csipetke egg noodles? Perfect for a hungry winter’s dinner, or freeze ahead for a satisfyingly lazy lunch.

Authentic Hungarian Goulash (Gulyas) - A hearty, winter meal filled with fantastic paprika and spice flavour. The beef melts in your mouth, so get out your crusty bread and dip it in! | wandercooks.com

(In a rush? Click here to jump straight to the recipe!)

Okay, forget the famous Budapest Chain Bridge, or the ancient Fisherman’s Bastion. This Traditional Hungarian Goulash always brings us back to the incredible night when we first learned this recipe.

You see, calling it just ‘thunder’ seems a bit underwhelming, because the storm we experienced that night was INSANE.

In a scary, exciting… not-sure-if-we’re-gonna-die kind of way.

A split-second flash of lightning turned night into day before – BOOOOOOOM – the night exploded right above our heads.

Car alarms shrieked, dogs barked, while we huddled, rugged up as we were in our tiny cosy tent outside on the balcony.

Because who wouldn’t want front-row seats to one of Mother Nature’s angriest performances?

Authentic Hungarian Goulash (Gulyas) - A hearty, winter meal filled with fantastic paprika and spice flavour. The beef melts in your mouth, so get out your crusty bread and dip it in! | wandercooks.com

 

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We’d been staying with our host Balazs and his father, talking all things Hungarian cuisine, when the topic of Authentic Hungarian Goulash came into conversation.

Immediately we decided we’d cook it together that night, with Balazs and his father sharing the secrets of their favourite recipe.

So what’s the biggest thing that blew our minds?

Well, most of the world thinks that Hungarian goulash is a stew. But as it turns out, most of the world is wrong… 😛

Authentic Hungarian Goulash (Gulyas) - A hearty, winter meal filled with fantastic paprika and spice flavour. The beef melts in your mouth, so get out your crusty bread and dip it in! | wandercooks.com

This dish just screams winter comfort, doesn’t it? But if it isn’t a stew, what is it?

Authentic Hungarian Goulash (Gulyas)

In Hungary, Authentic Hungarian Goulash isn’t a stew at all, it’s actually more like a chunky soup.

For one thing, it’s got a much thinner consistency than stew, but is still packed with that rich, warming flavour that we all know and love.

The key to that flavour is paprika – it is 100% essential for this dish.

The remaining ingredients – Hungarian sausage (csabai), chunks of beef, carrots, potatoes, celeriac and onions – are slow simmered in a pressure cooker until soft and tender.

Next up flicks of homemade egg noodles called csipetke (pronounced chip-ET-keh, they’re really similar to German Spaetzle) are added to the soup before being served with thick slices of crusty bread.

Authentic Hungarian Goulash (Gulyas) - A hearty, winter meal filled with fantastic paprika and spice flavour. The beef melts in your mouth, so get out your crusty bread and dip it in! | wandercooks.com

Now, before you freak out, csipetke are SUUUUPER SIMPLE to make, and you definitely WON’T need to crack out that pasta machine.

All you need is a mixing bowl, your egg-based batter, a flat paddle like this (or a chopping board) and a knife to ‘flick’ small slivers of the dough into the soup while it’s bubbling away on the stove.

Before you ask, yep, you can omit this step if that’s more convenient for you. But when it’s this fun why would you? 😀

Authentic Hungarian Goulash (Gulyas) - A hearty, winter meal filled with fantastic paprika and spice flavour. The beef melts in your mouth, so get out your crusty bread and dip it in! | wandercooks.com

Looking for more comforting winter dishes? Check out this intensely smoky Dutch Split Pea Soup (aka SNERT – only the best recipe name everr), or this nourishing Greek Moussaka Vegetable Bake.

Click on the images below to jump to these tasty recipes:


5.0 from 3 reviews
Authentic Hungarian Goulash (Gulyas)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Authentic Hungarian Goulash (Gulyas) is the ULTIMATE comfort food. What’s not to love about slow-simmered beef and potatoes infused with spicy paprika and homemade csipetke egg noodles? Perfect for a hungry winter’s dinner, or freeze ahead for a satisfyingly lazy lunch.
Author:
Recipe type: Dinner
Cuisine: Hungarian
Ingredients
  • 1 kg beef, cut into cubes
  • 1 Hungarian sausage, sliced
  • 700 g potatoes, diced
  • 2 brown onions, chopped
  • 3 carrots, sliced
  • 2 parsnips, sliced
  • ½ celeriac, chopped into 1 cm cubes
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 1 tbsp copha, fat or vegetable oil for cooking
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 heaped tbsp sweet paprika
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • ½ tsp chilli powder
  • 1 ½ cups beef stock
  • hot water
For the Noodles
  • ½ cup white flour
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tbsp water
  • Pinch salt & pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. First step is to slow cook the beef. Just pop it in a pressure cooker or pot and cover completely with water. Bring to the boil then allow to simmer (You'll need to cook it for for an hour in a pressure cooker, or 2 hours if you're using a normal pot on the stove). Reserve as much jus from the beef as possible - we’ll be using this later.
  2. While the beef is cooking, heat your copha, fat or vegetable oil in a fry pan and add your onions and garlic. Cook carefully until soft and translucent. Whatever you do, don’t burn the onions, because this will totally change the flavour and you don’t want that.
  3. Once the beef has cooked, add all that lovely cooked onion and garlic along with the potatoes, carrots, parsnips, celeriac, dry spices, Hungarian sausage and beef stock to the pan.
  4. Bring it all to a boil, then let that baby simmer (uncovered) for one more hour, topping up with extra hot water as required to keep everything covered and maintain a soft, soupy consistency.
  5. Now, while the soup is simmering, it’s time to create your csipetke noodles. Add the white flour, egg, salt and pepper to a mixing bowl, mix until smooth and well combined, then allow to rest. In the last 10 mins of cooking, pop a dab of dough onto a paddle and flick small slivers at a time into the soup using a knife. Dip the knife into the soup after every flick to stop the dough from sticking.
  6. Serve immediately with hot crusty bread and butter. YUMMMM.

 

Authentic Hungarian Goulash (Gulyas) - A hearty, winter meal filled with fantastic paprika and spice flavour. The beef melts in your mouth, so get out your crusty bread and dip it in! | wandercooks.com

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  • Erika
    08/08/2016 at 9:31 pm

    Hi,

    I liked your recipe,it is not authentic, but close and I liked much more better than other one. I would like to tell you it is a galuska that you made and not csipetke. We use to make csipetke our pulp and the dough is different. Hungarian Goulash made by just beef without sausage,and chili depend on personal taste. I miss bay-leave as well. You don’t need to use beef stock, just water. Unfortunately the cooking techniques is not proper at all. Authentic Hungarian Goulash spices are salt, bay-leave, garlic, sweet peppers, caraway, (black peppers either, but we use in it often.) Good recipe, thank you! Erika

    • Wandercooks
      15/08/2016 at 11:32 am

      Hey Erika, thanks for stopping by. Interesting about galuska and csipetke dough. The way we made this goulash and csipetke was taught to us by our Hungarian friends in Budapest. We’d love to experiment with your method as well!

  • Bintu - Recipes From A Pantry
    23/06/2016 at 10:23 pm

    What a perfect dish for a cold day. Could you also serve this with a jacket potato or mash as well?

    • Wandercooks
      28/06/2016 at 8:10 am

      Oooh yes why not? You could omit the potatoes from the dish itself and serve alongside as mash or buttery jacket-potatoes instead. Yum!

  • Gloria @ Homemade & Yummy
    23/06/2016 at 8:40 pm

    It has been a long time since I made a pot of goulash. This sounds wonderful. Perfect comfort food, and makes great leftovers too.

    • Wandercooks
      28/06/2016 at 8:06 am

      Yep! The flavours are even better the next day, or even after frozen. This is a good one to cook up a big batch and treat yourself to a nice easy dinner at another time. 😛

  • Florentina
    23/06/2016 at 4:06 pm

    What a hearty comforting meal. It will have to wait until the temperature drops a bit though, but then it has to be made!

    • Wandercooks
      28/06/2016 at 8:05 am

      Yep, it’s a perfect dish on a cold winter’s night, especially with crusty bread and a nice glass of wine. 😉

  • Heather
    23/06/2016 at 11:51 am

    What an awesome dish! My step father is from Hungary and my mother would make this for him all the time when I was growing up… let me tell you this … hers never looked anywhere near so delicious (sorry Mom) !!!! I love this recipe and can’t wait to share it with my step dad 🙂 Thanks!

    • Wandercooks
      23/06/2016 at 1:14 pm

      Haha thanks Heather! Have to say though, with recipes like these appearance means nothing… flavour is everything! Hope you guys enjoy. 😀

  • Cindy Gordon (Vegetarian Mamma)
    23/06/2016 at 12:44 am

    This looks delicious! Seriously, your pictures make me want to dive in! Love your light hearted humor and grace that shows through each of your posts! Always a pleasure to stop by!

    • Wandercooks
      23/06/2016 at 10:01 am

      Aww thanks Cindy that means so much to hear. It’s so much fun cooking, photographing and sharing our story with our awesome readers, even more than eating our creations haha. We’re really glad you enjoyed the post! 🙂

  • Stella @ Stellicious Life
    21/06/2016 at 10:13 pm

    When I received your newsletter today and saw that it claimed to feature the recipe for the Authentic Hungarian Goulash I was curious to see whether it truly was authentic (you see I’m Hungarian ;-), and I have to report that except for the sausage (never ate it with sausage -> but I can see how in some parts of Hungary they might add some sausage for extra flavour), it really is the real deal!! You don’t know how happy this makes me, because most of the world calls something completely different (usually a stew -> pörkölt in Hungarian) goulash.

    So kudos to you Ladies and yep, it is delicious and comforting, and now you made me crave a big bowl of goulash even though it’s summer here 🙂

    • Wandercooks
      22/06/2016 at 8:24 am

      Phew! So glad it passed the test!! That is interesting about the sausage, we were surprised we even managed to find it in our little part of town. So glad to have stumbled across this on our travels though, it really is such an awesome dish. Just turn your air-conditioner up to the max and pretend it’s winter 😛 Thanks for getting in touch Stella! 😀

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