Asian Recipes/ Drinks/ Recipes/ Vietnamese

Vietnamese Soy Milk 3 Ways – Sữa Đậu Nành

11/08/2020

Make your own easy Vietnamese soy milk at home with only a few ingredients and no overnight soaking required! Includes 3 ways – pandan, peanut and original flavour and a step-by-step video so you get it just right.

Three glasses of soy milk - original, pandan and peanut flavoured.

Why We Love This

Who doesn’t love being able to create their own milk at home. Especially one that’s so easy to make, and so versatile with the flavours you can create. If your vegan, this is a great dairy alternative to make at home.

Aside from tasting great, it’s also no-waste, as you can cook all sorts from biscuits, muffins and stir frys with the left over soybean pulp, known as okara.

Glass of fresh soy milk with soy beans.

What is Vietnamese soy milk? 

Vietnamese soy milk (sữa đậu nành) is a traditional and super popular drink in Vietnam. It’s exactly like regular soy milk, but usually drunk warm and purchased alongside street food. You’ll see a plate of sweet baked goods being ripped apart and dipped straight in the milk in some areas of Vietnam like Da Lat.

They come in all sorts of flavours, which is why we wanted to share three of them with you today – original, pandan and peanut butter!

Where we discovered it:

It was a freezing evening walking through the Da Lat night markets, on the very same night we discovered Vietnamese Pizza. We took our pizzas in hand and turned around to see these huge steaming pots across the way with a small line up of people. We had to know what it was! Before we knew it, we had a big bag each, filled to the brim with hot, fresh soy milk. It was the perfect addition to our strolling dinner in the highlands of Da Lat. Laura had the peanut butter and I had the pandan. They used pandan leaves to flavour their soy milk, rather than the flavouring we used today. You can totally use 2 tied pandan leaves in your milk instead of the flavouring if you prefer.

Pouring pandan soy milk at Da Lat night market in Vietnam.

What You’ll Need

For the base you only need two ingredients – soybeans and sugar. The amount of water will depend on the amount your cooking. The only other ingredients are for the flavouring – pandan and peanut butter. We recommend smooth peanut butter so you don’t get any chunks in the milk, or you’ll have to strain it again.

Pandan Flavouring: Sometimes called the ‘Vanilla of the East’, pandan is a staple addition to both savoury and sweet cooking in many Asian dishes. If you can find pandan leaves fresh, get them! The scent and aroma they infuse is amazing. Use 1-2 knotted leaves to flavour your soy milk, or in our case, we used 1/2 tsp of pandan flavouring. The leaves and flavouring should be available at most Asian supermarkets.

Soybeans: These are pea-sized cream coloured beans that are packed with protein. We bought ours in bulk at the Asian supermarket. It’s recommended to use organic soy beans if you can for the best flavour.

Ingredients laid out for homemade soy milk.

How to make it at home:

  1. Pop half a cup of soybeans in a colander over a bowl and fill with water. Wash thoroughly with your hands and pick out any discoloured, misshapen or floating soybeans. Drain.
  2. & 3. Soaking your soybeans:
    Quick Method: Fill a medium saucepan with water and bring it to the boil, then pour in your washed soybeans and continue to boil for a minute. Next, switch off the heat and allow the soybeans to soak in the hot water for around an hour until they double in size. At this point, you should be able to pick up a bean and easily break it in half.
    Lazy Method: Before bed, pop your washed soybeans in a bowl or jar and fill with 3 times as much water. Allow to soak overnight for 8 hours. If the weather is cooler, you may need to allow up to 12-14 hours.
  1. Making the soy milk: We’re going to blend the beans first. If you are making a double or triple batch or have a small blender, do this in short bursts and smaller batches so you don’t overheat the machine. We used our KitchenAid Blender on Smoothie Mode. Add 2 cups of filtered water for every 1 cup of soaked beans.
  2. Next, setup either a nut milk bag or a cheesecloth-lined colander over a bowl. It’s time to strain the milk! Pour in batches again so it doesn’t overflow or get too clogged with the okara (soy milk pulp).
  3. Then pull the edges of the cloth together and squeeze the pulp to extract the milk.
  1. Keep the Okara aside to make into another recipe or use it in your compost. Use a spoon to carefully press the soy milk through the bag or cloth.
  2. Pour your soy milk into a saucepan and add the sugar. Bring to a boil. Stir continuously to avoid the soy milk sticking to the bottom of the pan. Once it starts to boil, it will foam up quickly – so keep your eyes on this step at all times and switch it to low simmer as soon as it foams up to avoid it boiling over.
  3. Once simmering, you can stir occasionally and skim off any foam or skin that forms on top and discard. Simmer for a further 10 minutes. For an earthier drink, stop the cooking here. For a sweeter soy milk, keep cooking for another 10 – 20 minutes. You can taste test along the way until you get it just right!
  1. For Original Flavour: Once switched off, it’s ready to drink as is – warm or cool.
  2. For Pandan: Add 1/2 tsp of pandan flavouring while it’s simmering. Stir through until nice and green. Check the flavour and add more pandan to suit your taste.
  3. For Peanut Butter: Add 1 tbsp of smooth peanut butter while it’s simmering. Mix through until the peanut butter has completely melted. Best served warm.

Wandercook’s Tips

  • Water: For every 1 cup of soaked soy beans, you want to add 2 cups of water for blending.
  • Beans: For every 1/2 cup of dried soy beans, you’ll get around 2-3 cups of soaked soy beans.
  • If you’re wanting to drink soy milk frequently, it might be easiest to invest in a soy milk maker to take out a lot of the hands on work.
  • Make sure you’ve squeezed all the milk you can at the straining step to get the most milk out of your soybeans.

FAQs

What’s the best way to store homemade soy milk?

We pop any leftovers in sterilised jars in the fridge. It’ll keep for around 5 days. If it starts to smell sour, it’s time to get rid of it.

What else can I use the milk for?

So many things! Pop it in your morning coffee or pour over your cereal as a dairy milk alternative. If you want to take it one step further, you can even make it into homemade tofu! It also goes great in cooking for things like cakes, muffins and pancakes. Anything that calls for milk, you can usually replace with soy milk.

How can you make soy milk taste better?

Not everyone likes the taste of soy, but there are a couple of ways you can make it much easier to drink. The first is to add more sweetener – whether this is sugar, honey or maple syrup. If that doesn’t help, another option is to cook it for longer while it’s simmering – even for half an hour – to make it a little naturally sweeter and less earthy. Finally, experiment with different flavours to hide the soy taste. We’ve done pandan and peanut butter in this recipe, but you might like to try adding cocoa for a chocolate soy fix or even almond, mint or vanilla extract to see how you like it.

Variations & Substitutes

  • You can use pandan leaves if you can get them fresh or frozen, instead of using the pandan flavouring.
Green coloured pandan soy milk with soy beans.

Still thirsty? Here’s some more drink ideas:

★ Did you make this recipe? Please leave a star rating below!

Three glasses of soy milk, with soy beans.

Vietnamese Soy Milk 3 Ways – Sữa Đậu Nành

Make your own easy Vietnamese soy milk at home with only a few ingredients and no overnight soaking required! Includes 3 ways – pandan, peanut and original flavour and a step-by-step video so you get it just right.
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Soaking TIme: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Course: Drink
Cuisine: Vietnamese
Servings: 4 cups of soy milk
Calories: 111kcal
Author: Wandercooks
Cost: $5

Equipment

Ingredients

  • ½ cup soy beans dried
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • ½ tsp pandan flavouring
  • 1 tbsp peanut butter smooth
  • filtered water for blending

Instructions

  • Pop half a cup of soybeans in a colander over a bowl and fill with water. Wash thoroughly with your hands and pick out any discoloured, misshapen or floating soybeans. Drain.

Soaking your soybeans:

  • Quick Method: Fill a medium saucepan with water and bring it to the boil, then pour in your washed soybeans and continue to boil for a minute. Next, switch off the heat and allow the soybeans to soak in the hot water for around an hour until they double in size. At this point, you should be able to pick up a bean and easily break it in half.
  • Lazy Method: Before bed, pop your washed soybeans in a bowl or jar and fill with 3 times as much water. Allow to soak overnight for 8 hours. If the weather is cooler, you may need to allow up to 12-14 hours.

Making the soy milk:

  • We’re going to blend the beans first. If you are making a double or triple batch or have a small blender, do this in short bursts and smaller batches so you don’t overheat the machine. We used our KitchenAid ½Blender on Smoothie Mode. Add 2 cups of filtered water for every 1 cup of soaked beans.
  • Next, setup either a nut milk bag or a cheesecloth-lined colander over a bowl. It’s time to strain the milk! Pour in batches again so it doesn’t overflow or get too clogged with the okara (soy milk pulp).
  • Then pull the edges of the cloth together and squeeze the pulp to extract the milk.
  • Keep the Okara aside to make into another recipe or use it in your compost. Use a spoon to carefully press the soy milk through the bag or cloth.
  • Pour your soy milk into a saucepan and add the sugar. Bring to a boil. Stir continuously to avoid the soy milk sticking to the bottom of the pan. Once it starts to boil, it will foam up quickly – so keep your eyes on this step at all times and switch it to low simmer as soon as it foams up to avoid it boiling over.
  • Once simmering, you can stir occasionally and skim off any foam or skin that forms on top and discard. Simmer for a further 10 minutes. For an earthier drink, stop the cooking here. For a sweeter soy milk, keep cooking for another 10 – 20 minutes. You can taste test along the way until you get it just right!

Flavouring the soy milk:

  • For Original Flavour: Once switched off, it’s ready to drink as is – warm or cool.
  • For Pandan: Add 1/2 tsp of pandan flavouring while it’s simmering. Stir through until nice and green. Check the flavour and add more pandan to suit your taste.
  • For Peanut Butter: Add 1 tbsp of smooth peanut butter while it’s simmering. Mix through until the peanut butter has completely melted. Best served warm.

Video

Notes

Tips to get this just right:
  • Water: For every 1 cup of soaked soy beans, you want to add 2 cups of water for blending.
  • Beans: For every 1/2 cup of dried soy beans, you’ll get around 2-3 cups of soaked soy beans.
  • Make sure you’ve squeezed all the milk you can at the straining step to get the most milk out of your soybeans.
  • Storage: Pop any leftovers in sterilised jars in the fridge. It’ll keep for around 5 days. If it starts to smell sour, it’s time to get rid of it.
  • Pandan:  You can use pandan leaves if you can get them fresh or frozen, instead of using the pandan flavouring.
  • Taste: Not everyone likes the taste of soy, but there are a couple of ways you can make it much easier to drink.
    • Add more sweetener – whether this is sugar, honey or maple syrup.
    • Cook it for longer while it’s simmering (30 minutes) to make it naturally sweeter and less earthy.
    • Experiment with different flavours to hide the soy taste. We’ve done pandan and peanut butter, but you might like to try adding cocoa for a chocolate soy fix or even almond, mint or vanilla extract to see how you like it.

Nutrition

Calories: 111kcal | Carbohydrates: 16g | Protein: 5g | Fat: 4g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 69mg | Potassium: 137mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 14g | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 22mg | Iron: 1mg
Hey hey – Did you make this recipe?We’d love it if you could give a star rating below ★★★★★ and show us your creations on Instagram! Snap a pic and tag @wandercooks / #Wandercooks
Vietnamese Soy Milk 3 Ways - Sữa Đậu Nành

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