Asian Recipes/ Japanese/ Pasta & Noodles/ Recipes/ Soup

Tsukemen Dipping Ramen with Miso

10/01/2023

Dunk your ramen noodles into a rich broth of miso flavoured tsukemen! This easy dipping ramen recipe is a super fun treat to whip up for lunch or dinner, and it’s ready under 20 minutes.

Ramen noodles being dunked into a bowl of tsukemen.

Why We Love This

We love that the thickness of the soup helps it cling to the ramen noodles as you dip.

It’s perfect for any season. Need a winter warmer? Serve the ramen piping hot. Need to cool down? Run the ramen under water after cooking, and serve them cold!

Related: Spicy Miso Ramen / Tantanmen Ramen

A bowl of miso tsukemen and ramen noodles, ready to dip.

What is Tsukemen? 

Tsukemen (つけ麺) is a Japanese noodle dish that literally translates to dipping ramen. The broth is thick, rich and served in a separate bowl to the ramen noodles.

It’s eaten by dipping the ramen directly into the tsukemen broth then slurped up straight from the bowl. The ramen noodles will usually be served on a wide plate or bowl, and the dipping broth in a small bowl.

Below is pork tsukemen we thoroughly enjoyed after riding the kibiji trail in Okayama, Japan. You can see how chunky the soup base can be!

A bowl of tsukemen is topped with half a boiled egg and nori seaweed sheet.

What You’ll Need

  • Ramen Noodles – This recipe traditionally calls for fresh wheat-based ramen noodles which can be sourced from an Asian grocery or market. But to keep things easy you can use either dry ramen noodles or shelf fresh noodles cooked to packet directions. You don’t even have to use ramen – you could use homemade udon noodles if you prefer. The key is to make sure they’re wheat based noodles, which have that delicious chewy texture. 
  • Spring Onion / Green Onion – Adding a little crunch and freshness to the dish, try to pick smaller spring onion as it’s sweeter and goes well alongside the other toppings.
  • Ginger and Garlic – Fresh chopped ginger and garlic work best. It gives the broth a nice flavour punch!
  • Mirin / SugarMirin is a sweet Japanese rice wine for cooking. You can also use sugar if you need.
  • Rice Wine Vinegar – Look for this in the international aisle at your local supermarket, otherwise head to an Asian grocer or buy online. If you don’t have this, you can substitute for apple cider vinegar, white wine vinegar, or white vinegar.
  • Chicken Stock – A nice mild soup base. Sub with any preferred stock such as beef, vegetable or dashi stock.
  • Red Miso Paste Sub with half red and half white miso paste or just white for milder flavour.
  • Bonito Flakes / Katsuobushi– Bonito Flakes (Katsuobushi in Japanese) are skipjack tuna flakes that have been simmered, smoked and fermented to help give dashi the umami kick.
  • Rayu Chilli Oil – This delicious Japanese condiment is the perfect blend of sesame oil and chilli without being over the top spicy. You can easily make rayu oil at home, find it at Asian groceries or buy online if needed. To substitute, just use regular sesame oil with a sprinkling of chilli powder to taste. 

Wandercook’s Tips

  • Ramen Noodles – Serve your noodles hot or cold, it’s up to you!
  • Make Ahead – You can always make the broth and noodles the night before if you want to take them for a work lunch. Just store both separately in airtight containers in the fridge.
  • Storage – While we don’t recommend freezing the noodles or tsukemen broth, you can store both in the fridge for up to a couple of days. We recommend cooking the ramen noodles right before you’re eating them though for the freshest results.

FAQs

How do you eat tsukemen?

Pick up a small amount of ramen noodles and dip them into your tsukemen soup before slurping it up together, straight out of the tsukemen bowl.

Should you drink the tsukemen broth?

You shouldn’t drink the tsukemen broth straight, as it’s concentrated so it will stick to the noodles, so it will be quite salty. If you have some broth leftover, add a cup of chicken stock to mellow the flavours and enjoy as a soup.

Can you get different flavoured tsukemen?

There are many tsukemen broth variations. The most popular is a pork based broth, which takes a lot of time and energy. Miso is another favourite, and the easiest to make it at home.

Some ramen restaurants will have speciality tsukemen flavours such as yuzu or even cheese tsukemen!

Variations

  • Toppings – Make it a bigger meal by adding things like boiled eggs, nori seaweed sheets, chashu pork slices or pile on some nikumiso.
Chopsticks dip ramen noodles into a bowl of tsukemen.

Try these amazing recipes next:

★ Did you make this recipe? Please leave a comment and a star rating below!

Dipping ramen topped with green onion slices.

Tsukemen Dipping Ramen with Miso

Dunk your ramen noodles into a rich broth of miso flavoured tsukemen! This easy dipping ramen recipe is a super fun treat to whip up for lunch or dinner, and it's ready under 20 minutes.
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 15 minutes
Course: Dinner, Lunch, Soup
Cuisine: Japanese
Servings: 2 Serves
Calories: 548kcal
Author: Wandercooks
Cost: $8

Ingredients

Optional garnishes:

Instructions

  • Cook the ramen noodles according to packet directions. Drain and sit aside if you want them warm, or run under cold water if you prefer cold noodles.
    200 g ramen noodles
  • Heat the vegetable oil in a small saucepan over a low-medium heat. Add the spring onion, ginger and garlic and fry for 1-2 mins until fragrant.
    ½ tbsp vegetable oil, ½ cup spring onion, 1 tsp ginger, 1 tsp garlic
  • Add the soy sauce, mirin, sugar, rice wine vinegar and chicken stock then increase the heat to medium-high and bring to the boil.
    1 tbsp soy sauce, ½ tbsp mirin, 1 tsp sugar, 1 tsp rice wine vinegar, 200 ml chicken stock
  • In a small dish, mix together the cold water and cornstarch / cornflour to form a slurry. Pour into the soup and stir to thicken (around 1-2 minutes). Turn off the heat.
    1 tbsp cold water, 1 tsp cornstarch / cornflour
  • Place the red miso into a strainer and dunk into the soup. Use a spoon to dissolve the miso paste.
    2 tbsp red miso
  • Optional: Add the katsuobushi / bonito flakes and rayu chilli oil and stir through.
    2 tbsp bonito flakes / katsuobushi, 1/4 tsp rayu chilli oil
  • Portion out the tsukemen soup into two small bowls. Place the ramen noodles into separate bowls ready to dip.

Recipe Notes

  • Ramen Noodles – Serve your noodles hot or cold, it’s up to you!
  • Make Ahead – You can always make the broth and noodles the night before if you want to take them for a work lunch. Just store both separately in airtight containers in the fridge.
  • Storage – While we don’t recommend freezing the noodles or tsukemen broth, you can store both in the fridge for up to a couple of days. We recommend cooking the ramen noodles right before you’re eating them though for the freshest results.
  • Toppings – Make it a bigger meal by adding things like boiled eggs, nori seaweed sheets, chashu pork slices or pile on some nikumiso.

Nutrition

Nutrition Facts
Tsukemen Dipping Ramen with Miso
Amount per Serving
Calories
548
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
18
g
28
%
Saturated Fat
 
8
g
50
%
Polyunsaturated Fat
 
2
g
Monounsaturated Fat
 
8
g
Cholesterol
 
4
mg
1
%
Sodium
 
3357
mg
146
%
Potassium
 
426
mg
12
%
Carbohydrates
 
79
g
26
%
Fiber
 
4
g
17
%
Sugar
 
8
g
9
%
Protein
 
17
g
34
%
Vitamin A
 
279
IU
6
%
Vitamin C
 
6
mg
7
%
Calcium
 
65
mg
7
%
Iron
 
5
mg
28
%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Hey hey – Did you make this recipe?We’d love it if you could give a star rating below ★★★★★ and show us your creations on Instagram! Snap a pic and tag @wandercooks / #Wandercooks
Tsukemen Dipping Ramen with Miso

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2 Comments

  • Reply
    Brooke
    12/01/2023 at 4:00 pm

    5 stars
    Forgive me, I actually have not made, but I wanted to shout out thanks to you for your wonderful recipes and good humor, for lack of better words at the moment.

    • Reply
      Wandercooks
      13/01/2023 at 3:42 pm

      Oh thanks Brooke! You’re very welcome, and happy cooking adventures ahead!

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