Breakfast/ European/ Recipes

Tattie Scones – Scottish Potato Pancakes

14/03/2024

You know breakfast is going to be good when tattie scones are involved. This 3 ingredient Scottish breakfast is cooked to crispy, golden perfection with just potatoes, butter and flour – how it should be!

A wooden spatula flips over a tattie scone, showing the brown, crispy outside.

Why We Love This

Tattie scones are filling and satisfying, plus they make your house smell divine!

Enjoy them for breakfast or as a quick snack. (As Aussies we love them with a little vegemite on top, or even a scoop of jam – yum yum!)

We’ve written the recipe below including instructions for mashing the potatoes. But if you already have leftover mashed potatoes from another meal, this is a great way to use them up!

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Related: Korean Potato Pancakes / Lorne Sausage

A stack of triangular tattie scones, browned and ready to eat.

What are Tattie Scones?

Tattie scones are a popular breakfast in Scotland. They’re made from a dough of mashed potatoes, flour and butter, then cooked in extra butter until gorgeously golden brown with lightly crispy edges.

They’re similar to Irish potato pancakes known as farls, and also known as griddle cakes elsewhere in the UK.

You’ll usually find them wedged in a morning roll alongside a lorne sausage, fried egg and slathered in that tamata sauce! When served with a big breakfast, it’s almost like the equivalent of having a hashbrown on the plate, albeit with a much fluffier texture on the inside!

What You’ll Need

  • Potatoes – Any potato that’s good for mashing is good for tattie scones. The key is the high starch content. Or just use leftover potato mash if you have some handy!
  • Flour – We use self raising flour which gives it that extra bit of height and fluff when cooked. You can sub with all purpose flour and a teaspoon of baking paper.
  • Butter – We use salted butter. If you only have unsalted, you might like to add a pinch of salt. We avoid adding pepper, that way we can serve them savour or sweet once cooked!
Ingredients laid out to make Scottish potato scones.

How to Make Scottish Potato Scones

First, gather your ingredients: See recipe card below for measurements.

  1. Note: If using leftover mashed potatoes, skip to Step 3.
    Cover potatoes in cold water and bring to a boil in a medium saucepan. Boil until soft, around 15 minutes.
  2. Drain the potatoes then add the butter and mash potatoes until smooth. Finish off by whipping the mash potato with a fork for an ultra fluffy finish.
  3. Add the self raising flour and gently work it together with a wooden spoon or on low to medium if you’re using a mixer. It should come together as a dough that is light and pliable, but not sticking to your hands. Important: You may need to adjust the flour amount depending on the moisture content of your potato.
  1. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured work surface. Lightly flour a rolling pin and gently roll out the dough until it’s around 1 cm / ½ inch thick then slice into quarters.
  2. Heat a large heavy frying pan (such as cast iron or wrought iron) over medium heat, then pop your butter in for frying. Place as many scones as will fit in your pan with room to flip and cook for 3-5 minutes per side until crispy and golden brown on the outside. Serve immediately while hot with just butter, jam or a full Scots breakfast!

Wandercook’s Tips

  • Using Leftover Potato Mash? – It’s easier to work with warm potatoes when making the dough, so reheat them in the microwave first until warm, but cool enough to knead by hand.
  • Saucepan – Use a heavy based griddle or cast iron pan if possible for even, consistent heat.
  • Heat – Cook on a medium heat as they can burn quite easily. You’d rather cook them for longer and really heat it through the middle and crisp up the outsides than end up with them burnt and black.
  • Appearance – Don’t be too fussed on how they look, because even if yours turn out ugly, they’ll still taste great.
  • Bacon Fat – Amp up the flavour by cooking them in the bacon pan if you’re doing a big breakfast for extra flavour!

Storage, Freezing & Reheating

Leftover tattie scones will last a day or so in the fridge in an airtight container. It’s a good idea to layer the scones with baking paper to stop them sticking together or to the container. Reheat in the microwave, in the toaster, or in a pan on the stove until warmed through.

You can also freeze them once cooked, and to reheat we love popping them straight in the toaster.

FAQs

Why was there not enough / too much flour when I added it to the potatoes?

It’s so important to know that the amount of flour will vary slightly for everyone. It should be around a cup of flour. You may need a little less or a little more.

At the end of the day, you need to be able to lightly handle and knead the dough without it sticking to your fingers. That’s the perfect texture you’re striving for. See our recipe video to see this in action.

If it’s too dry and crumbly, you can add a little extra butter or a dash of milk.

If it’s too wet, just keep adding a sprinkle of flour until the dough comes together.

Can you toast tattie scones?

Yep! This is known as the second cook, and quite common. We like to toast ours the day after to recrisp them up and it works perfectly.

Serving Ideas & Variations

  • Scots Breakfast – Serve your scones with all the trimmings for a traditional Scottish breakfast – runny or fried eggs, bacon, fried tomatoes, mushrooms, fried haggis slices, black pudding, toast and maybe even baked beans. Or try them on a morning roll with a slice of Lorne sausage, slathered with broon sauce! Serve with an ice cold Irn Bru soft drink for extra Scottish flair.
  • Extra Flavour – Add your favourite herbs such as chives, thyme or sage, or cheeses such as grated Parmesan or cheddar. Spices such as garlic and/or onion powder or vegetable stock are quick ways to tweak the flavour.
  • Shapes – The more common / traditional way to make them is to roll out the dough into a round shape, then cut it into quarters. At home, feel free to make them any way you like. You could roll small portions into mini scones, or cut your dough into six or eight pieces just like a pizza.
  • Make it Vegan – Use Nuttelex or any vegan butter alternative instead of dairy butter.
Golden tattie scones on a black plate and background.

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★ Did you make this recipe? Please leave a comment and a star rating below!

A spatula flips a tattie scone on a cast iron frying pan.

Tattie Scones – Scottish Potato Pancakes

You know breakfast is going to be good when tattie scones are involved. This 3 ingredient Scottish breakfast is cooked to crispy, golden perfection with just potatoes, butter and flour – how it should be!
5 from 2 votes
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Scottish
Servings: 4 Scones
Calories: 288kcal
Author: Wandercooks
Cost: $5

Ingredients

For the tattie scone mix

  • 500 g potatoes 1.1 lb / around 5 small potatoes, peeled & diced,
  • 30 g butter 1 oz, salted
  • 1 cup self raising flour 150 g / 5.3 oz, sub all purpose flour and 1 tsp baking powder

To cook the scones

Instructions

Note: If using leftover mashed potatoes, skip to Step 3.

  • Cover 500 g potatoes in cold water and bring to a boil in a medium saucepan. Boil until soft, around 15 minutes.
  • Drain the potatoes then add the 30 g butter and mash potatoes until smooth. Finish off by whipping the mash potato with a fork for an ultra fluffy finish.
  • Add the 1 cup self raising flour and gently work it together with a wooden spoon or on low to medium if you’re using a mixer. It should come together as a dough that is light and pliable, but not sticking to your hands. Important: You may need to adjust the flour amount depending on the moisture content of your potato.
  • Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured work surface. Lightly flour a rolling pin and gently roll out the dough until it’s around 1 cm / ½ inch thick then slice into quarters.
  • Heat a large heavy frying pan (such as cast iron or wrought iron) over medium heat, then pop your 1 tbsp butter in for frying. Place as many scones as will fit in your pan with room to flip and cook for 3-5 minutes per side until crispy and golden brown on the outside.
  • Serve immediately while hot with just butter, jam or a full Scots breakfast!

Video

YouTube video

Recipe Notes

  • Using Leftover Potato Mash? – It’s easier to work with warm potatoes when making the dough, so reheat them in the microwave first until warm, but cool enough to knead by hand.
  • Saucepan – Use a heavy based griddle or cast iron pan if possible for even, consistent heat.
  • Heat – Cook on a medium heat as they can burn quite easily. You’d rather cook them for longer and really heat it through the middle and crisp up the outsides than end up with them burnt and black.
  • Appearance – Don’t be too fussed on how they look, because even if yours turn out ugly, they’ll still taste great.
  • Bacon Fat – Amp up the flavour by cooking them in the bacon pan if you’re doing a big breakfast for extra flavour!
  • Scots Breakfast – Serve your scones with all the trimmings for a traditional Scottish breakfast – runny or fried eggs, bacon, fried tomatoes, mushrooms, fried haggis slices, black pudding, toast and maybe even baked beans. Or try them on a morning roll with a slice of Lorne sausage, slathered with broon sauce! Serve with an ice cold Irn Bru soft drink for extra Scottish flair.
  • Extra Flavour – Add your favourite herbs such as chives, thyme or sage, or cheeses such as grated Parmesan or cheddar. Spices such as garlic and/or onion powder or vegetable stock are quick ways to tweak the flavour.
  • Shapes – The more common / traditional way to make them is to roll out the dough into a round shape, then cut it into quarters. At home, feel free to make them any way you like. You could roll small portions into mini scones, or cut your dough into six or eight pieces just like a pizza.
  • Make it Vegan – Use Nuttelex or any vegan butter alternative instead of dairy butter.

Nutrition

Nutrition Facts
Tattie Scones – Scottish Potato Pancakes
Amount per Serving
Calories
288
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
10
g
15
%
Saturated Fat
 
6
g
38
%
Trans Fat
 
0.4
g
Polyunsaturated Fat
 
1
g
Monounsaturated Fat
 
2
g
Cholesterol
 
24
mg
8
%
Sodium
 
79
mg
3
%
Potassium
 
560
mg
16
%
Carbohydrates
 
45
g
15
%
Fiber
 
4
g
17
%
Sugar
 
1
g
1
%
Protein
 
6
g
12
%
Vitamin A
 
278
IU
6
%
Vitamin C
 
25
mg
30
%
Calcium
 
22
mg
2
%
Iron
 
1
mg
6
%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
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Tattie Scones - Scottish Potato Pancakes
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